The NSA is just one malware writer out of thousands

  • June 23, 2015
  • 2 min read

With the recent news concerning surveillance of antivirus software companies, The NSA is revealed to be just another actor on the stage of cyber security, creating state-sponsored malware to spy on businesses, agencies, and everyday internet users like you and me.

But you aren’t really surprised, are you? We aren’t here at Emsisoft. EVERYONE is monitored nowadays by big government agencies like the NSA and GCHQ (the NSA’s British equivalent, Government Communications Headquarters). Whether you’re an AV specialists or a toilet paper manufacturer, big government has its hand in your information.

What else is new?

It goes without saying that we all have a part to play in online privacy. Sure, there are holes in some antivirus software, as there are in all types of software. There also are holes in the way you conduct yourself online everyday, from weak passwords to transmitting sensitive information through free email providers.

But don’t let this “expose” about big brother scare your pants off! These holes are exploited daily by hundreds of malware writers.

The NSA may have an edge when it comes to the multitude of entry points it has to intercept traffic. But the NSA isn’t doing anything other malware writers aren’t already doing. To get to our internal information, the NSA must ultimately overcome the same hurdles that every hacker and malware writer must overcome.

To date, none have succeeded here at Emsisoft.

If you’ve checked out the article linked above and you’re still hit with a case of the heebie-jeebies, take solace in the fact that the NSA’s Project CAMBERDADA got some of the facts wrong in their presentation slides—in listing the anti-virus software companies they were targeting, both Eset and Nod32 are listed separately…even though Nod32 is a product of Eset, not a software company on its own.

Potenzielle Spionageziele (Quelle: The Incercept)

Potential targets (source: The Intercept)

So take it all with a grain of salt; it just takes a little misinformation to turn this molehill into a mountain.

(Additionally, how well can the NSA be at hacking if they don’t even know the names of their target?)

So what are we doing here at Emsisoft to ensure your protection and privacy?

Sure, we communicate freely with external partners and marketers. But no private information is shared, and I’m fairly certain that the NSA doesn’t get much use out our website banners and press releases.

But if you big-wigs are actually reading this somewhere out there, do you mind sharing your opinion on our branding strategy?

Have a nice, fear-free day.

 

Emsi

Emsi

Emsisoft founder and managing director. In 1998 when I was 16, a so called 'friend' sent me a file via ICQ that unexpectedly opened my CD-ROM drive, which gave me a big scare. It marked the start of my journey to fight trojans and other malware. My story

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